Fezzik’s engine was on its last leg

Josh started tearing it down earlier this week and shared some pictures.

Despite my staying on top of oil changes and coolant needs, the tired 6G74 was a complete mess inside. Blocked coolant passages, carbon buildup in the combustion chamber—I was literally driving a ticking time bomb.

Just like the two years I drove the truck not knowing it was still on the original timing belt—about 15,000 miles before it was due to have its third timing belt installed. The previous owner was clearly a hack.

Not that I’m a professional, but there’s only so much you can do to a 199,000-mile engine that’s been neglected for the better part of 20 years by previous owners. What can I say? I’ve bought some real Shitsubishis in the last decade.

(Miss you, Daisy.)

In any case, we yanked this one out in time. Josh will be able to bring it back to life and it will deliver years of reliable service in whatever Montero it eventually calls home.

Tonight, my new engine is pushing Fezzik and I up the hill to campout before Overland Expo West.

I’ll be at OXW tomorrow. If you’ll be there, too, let’s get together!

Ol’ Fezzik is gonna have a drink

Money has changed hands.

Plans have been hatched and finalized.

Fezzik is getting a freshly rebuilt engine—valve covers to oil pan—and a complete drivetrain service.

He’s about 2,000 miles shy of 200k. This is perfect timing.

And I think ol’ Fezzik is gonna have a drink with us.

(If it’s good enough for WRC…)

3 things 3 years with a $3,000 truck has taught me

1. Your skills are an asset—not a shortcut.

There’s nothing wrong with buying a $3000 vehicle when you can put another two grand into it to make it perfectly reliable—you’ve just got to follow through and commit to making it reliable right away.

2. You get out of your network what you put into it.

The more you help people solve their problems, the more people you’ll find willing to help you solve your problems. Fezzik is essentially sponsored by my friends. Thank you.

3. You can’t always get what you want. (You get what you need.)

Okay, so I learned this one from The Rolling Stones. But Fezzik’s really driven the lesson home.

Nice as it would be if Fezzik was a bespoke, overland rig like Linhbergh Nguyen’s—or pristinely gorgeous like Kevin Roy’s—I really just my Montero to be reasonably reliable and capable of going when the going gets tough.

. . .

I haven’t had a completely reliable Mitsubishi since Daisy, the 97 Talon I bought new in 1996. That’s going to change here in next couple months. (See #1, #2, and #3, above.)